Skip to main content

Follow Us           Xlogo

The Rich History of Beaumont Lodge and Astill Lodge Farmhouses

A Journey Back in Time

Introduction:

Nestled within the historic Beaumont Leys Estate lies a tale of two farmhouses that date back to the 17th Century. In this article, we take you on a journey through time to explore the origins, occupants, and current status of the Beaumont Lodge and Astill Lodge Farmhouses, while also highlighting their importance to the surrounding area.

BeaumontLodgeFarm2  

BeaumontLodgeFarm1

  BLodgeFarmhouse

 The main building dates back to 1686

 

Barn and outbuildings, now a thriving community centre

 

Beaumont Lodge Farmhouse

Images courtesy of Robin Matthewman

Beaumont Lodge Farm: A Testament to 17th Century Architecture

The late 17th Century witnessed the enclosure and division of the Beaumont Leys Estate into working farms, one of which was Beaumont Lodge Farm. This Grade II Listed Building, still standing today, offers a glimpse into the architectural style of the period. Its main building dates back to 1686 when Robert Thomas Hoby held a messuage and 7 closes called Hoby Ground, The Orchard, Rames Meadow, and Corn Close.

In its heyday, Beaumont Lodge Farm was a thriving hub, comprising multiple buildings within its own enclosure, including a messuage, barn, stable, yard, and garden. The farmstead was surrounded by picturesque ponds, some of which occupied natural springs. Occupied by George Thurnby in the late 17th Century, the farm covered an impressive 275 acres.

Astill Lodge Farm: A Lost Treasure

The Astill family, influential landholders of the late 18th and early 19th Centuries, owned the now-lost Astill Lodge Farm. It is believed to have been established during the mid-late 17th Century enclosures. In 1808, estate lease records documented that the farm consisted of a barn and stables. Field names such as Old House Close, Orchard Close, Round Meadow, Sibson's Long, Far Lawne, and Further Great Lawne reflect the landscape of the time.

John Benskins was recorded as the occupier in the Beaumont Leys Estate papers of 1655. In 1680, the property was described as a messuage with 6 closes named Netherlands House Close, Viccary Meadow, Bishops Laund, Nether Meadow, and Little Meadow. Unfortunately, the original Astill Lodge farm buildings no longer exist, and the site is now occupied by Osprey Road/Peregrine Rise.

Castle Hill Country Park: Preserving History

As a tribute to the rich history of these farmhouses, lands associated with both Beaumont Lodge and Astill Lodge Farms have been incorporated into Castle Hill Country Park, offering visitors a chance to connect with the area's past while enjoying the beauty of nature.